Vitavox Admiralty Pattern No1359 (1944 D-Day)

 

 

Vitavox Admiralty Pattern No1359

Vitavox Admiralty Pattern No1359

Whilst the BBC was broadcasting and recording many of the momentous events of World War 2 using the STC4017C, and American radio stations continued to use the original trusty Western Electric 618A, out on the high seas the British Royal Navy were issuing orders and communicating using the Vitavox Admiralty Pattern No 1359.

Because it looks very similar, I had previously thought that the Vitavox was simply a re-badged STC, but this is not the case. Having finally managed to unscrew the grills on both it is easy to see key differences.

Vitavox No1359 and STC4017c differences

1) The STC4017 (on the right) is very slightly larger than the Vitavox No 1359. 2) The Vitavox diaphragm is, however, a good deal larger than the STC. 3) The Vitavox has no equalising tube running from the front to the rear chamber . 4) The grill components are quite different.

CLICK HERE for Sound Clip.

The Admiralty Pattern No1359  is also mentioned in the Australian Royal Navy Fleet Orders for 1945 for use with radio & disc recording equipment. It is suggested here as an inferior alternative to the STC4021  (which has a much flatter frequency response).Australian Navy Fleet Orders 1945 excerpt.N.B. Coarse groove, direct cut, disc recording equipment was used extensively by broadcasters  and the military throughout WW2.

 

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9 responses to “Vitavox Admiralty Pattern No1359 (1944 D-Day)

  1. Dear Martin, thank you for your excellent web site and sharing your knowledge for us. I was hoping you could shed light on my 4017? It’s is the same as your one on the right but it says 4017 E.
    Not C or A/C. It also says Admiralty pattern 1201.
    Also the diaphragm is a really nice blue colour.

    Also, it sounds amazing, very atmospheric and one can not help imitating Mr Churchill, also sounds like Richard Burton doing ‘Under Milk Wood’. Black, Bible black black,,,,

    Thank you again Martin

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    • Hi John, Thanks for your comment. I’m glad you like the blog. The Admiralty Pattern 1359 is somewhat different in size and design to the STC4017c. However, as far as I know the AP 1201 was manufactured by STC and is absolutely identical to the 4017. The fact that yours has a 4017E marking probably indicates that it is a slightly later version (late 40’s early 50’s ? ) I use my 4017 a lot. It has great character. I’m sure you will enjoy yours.

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  2. P.S.
    I have an STC4021E with that same fabulous blue colour on the diaphragm. I think that it may have been due to a heat treatment process used on the aluminium.

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    • Thank you. the 4017 E has the serial number 349 by the way.

      Yes a lovely blue, my 4021 F has a blue ‘eye’ too.
      Seems STC were working their way up the alphabet as my 4035 is a D.

      I use a 4033c a lot by the way as a one mic job for guitar and vocals. Serial number 050, must be an early one.

      Thank you for all you help.
      Best wishes,
      John.

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  3. I used to have a 4021J !! Sounds like you have some nice mics 🙂

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    • Yes, and they all get used, except for the small, quirky 4113 E, which I have not worked out what it’s best for. The ribbon is horizontal which leads me to think it is used on it’s side, Any idea’s?

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  4. Jackie Evans

    HI there. I’ve just bought a mic that looks very much like the STC, but comes in a Vitavox case. I’ve been trying to date it, but Vitavox tell me it’s not one of theirs, despite it being written on the case! Would you be able to verify this for me if I’m able to send through some pictures?

    Many thanks
    Jackie

    Like

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