Category Archives: Hydrophones

JrF ‘D’ Series Hydrophone.

JrF D Series Hydrophone and matching transformer

The optional matching transformer is well worth buying to use with XLR inputs.

JrF D Series Hydrophone

Expanding on my recent forays into the wonderful world of outdoor recording I am now starting to explore the possibilities of recording underwater using my newly purchased JrF D-Series Hydrophone. These are handmade to order in the North of England by the acclaimed sound artist Jez Riley French. I was looking for a high quality, lightweight device that is quick and easy to deploy. It is also very reasonably priced!

Hydrophones and the world underwater.

Hydrophones utilise piezoelectric transducers to detect underwater vibrations and pressure differences. A piezoelectric transducer is a device that produces an electric current when a mechanical force is applied to it. No external power source is required. Piezoelectric materials are able to flex under pressure, converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. Because sound is a form of pressure wave that physically moves particles, it produces a mechanical force as it comes in contact with a hydrophone. The first widespread use of hydrophones was during WW1 when they were used to detect enemy submarines. This 100 year old technology is still alive and well! Today they also have wide ranging use in underwater exploration, seismology, aquatic research, and deep sea recording. Apart from these important scientific functions, hydrophones can also simply be used to capture fascinating and unusual sounds with which to delight the ear!

My first Hydrophone Recording

Some friends of ours have a pond in their garden and this seemed like a good place to start. Dropping the hydrophone into clear open water the initial results fell somewhat short of the whales and dolphins I had been imagining…………….  absolute silence!!

However, we persevered. Moving the hydrophone into a patch of water weed suddenly produced this strange sound!  Perhaps some alien life form sending code?   CLICK On Photo

The Ford

This next recording features a delivery van driving through a shallow ford across a stream. The hydrophone is positioned in the middle of the weir about 2 feet out into the stream. As the van passes we hear the initial waves caused by the wheels followed by a strange ‘phasing’ sound produced by the reflected waves bouncing back off the wall on the opposite bank.

The Duck

This final recording is a strange one from another local pond. I dropped the hydrophone into the water close to a large rock just below the surface about 3 feet out from the bank. Along came a duck and started to rub it’s beak on the stone only inches from the hydrophone. I thought at first it was sharpening it’s beak but I am informed by knowledgeable folk that this is in fact a sort of conditioning that ducks carry out. Who knew?

To Conclude

The JrF D-Series hydrophone is a great addition to my microphone collection and has opened up a whole new world of sound exploration. Thoroughly recommended.